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Thread: New to Cushings

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Georgia
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    13,969

    Default Re: New to Cushings

    OK Karen, I’m going to send you a private message to talk about another problem-solving option. We’re determined to get this figured out!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    Spring Valley, Il
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    Default Re: New to Cushings

    Just a quick update. Tried to feed Annie her breakfast this am and she refused to eat—I mean flat out refused to even get close to the plate. She has only had two doses of her maintenance Lysodren so I called the vet. They said to bring her in so I quickly made her a day pack of all her supplies and off we went. She was also very lethargic and urinated a lot before we loaded her up. Her last dose of Lysodren was on Sunday and she ate okay last night. I’m scared and don’ know what to think or feel given my mindset of late. I have to take off for a Dr’s appt. this afternoon and it’s over an hour away so we won’t know anything until we get home later. My dread is taking over. Will update you later. Karen

  3. #23
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    Mar 2009
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    rural central ARK
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    Default Re: New to Cushings

    Let us know what you learn. We are right beside you even tho you can see us!
    Hugs,
    Leslie
    "May you know that absence is full of tender presence and that nothing is ever lost or forgotten." John O'Donahue, "Eternal Echoes"

    Death is not a changing of worlds as most imagine, as much as the walls of this world infinitely expanding.

  4. #24
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    Georgia
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    Default Re: New to Cushings

    Thanks so much for letting us know. I surely understand your worry, but you’re doing exactly the right thing by taking her in. If, by chance, her adrenal function has truly dipped too low, the vet will be able to immediately start giving her any needed steroid supplementation. So she’s right where she needs to be right now. And we’ll be waiting right here beside you for the next update!

    Marianne

  5. #25
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    Default Re: New to Cushings

    Still right here, awaiting word about little Annie. Hang in there, Karen!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    Spring Valley, Il
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    169

    Default Re: New to Cushings

    BIG UPDATE

    For those of “our family” who are crying, or tearing up—that was me two nights ago---or those of our family who are rejoicing in a good day and crying tears of joy….let me recount the trials and tribulations of a day worth living with a newly diagnosed Cush pup—and a MOM who didn’t know any better. I laughed all afternoon at myself and I know my Gracie (departed 1-11-19) and big sis to Annie, was barking with laughter after a great 14 year run. I also saw this as a sign from Gracie to pull myself away from grieving her death and focus on her baby sis’s health and well-being. Bear with me as I recount the day to remember.

    When I posted this morning, I was in process of rushing my newly diagnosed pup to the vet because she REFUSED her breakfast…Annie has never refused food--- including post HGE events and flu. At 8am, she presented as a sick dog who I feared was in some kind of “collapse”—(I don’t even have my terminology yet correct. My Hubby, Jerry and I took off and left Annie at the vet with her dog pack of food, insulin, eye drops, leash, water bowl, and blanket. After handing over my limp, quivering pup to the vet tech, giving her all meds taken “forever”, and becoming semi-hysterical, she said they would take good care of my baby. ( Now is the time when all of you have my permission to moan a collective, OMG—how pathetic).

    Now, I digress to this past weekend. Wherever you are in the world, especially in North America, the weather has been horrible. The POLAR VORTEX hit us in Illinois, USA in early January. I digress further if you will forgive me. My little baby Annie, 10 yr. old newly diagnosed Cush pup has always been a snow dog. She is a beautiful black and silver miniature schnauzer being born and bred south of Tacoma, Washington. When I describe her as black and silver, I mean black as tar and her silver markings are as white as snow---when she’s clean. At diagnosis, her coat was as thick as a rug and still is. I’m thankful for that. Because of her thick coat, she has always loved snow---and as of this weekend, I can also add mud to her repertoire. I know many, many, many of our beloved pups love snow to some degree, but my Annie has always taken it to epic levels. This year after a record snowfall, brought her to the back door after she had figured out how to fully face plant her head in a bank of dripping wet snow. At this point I wish I could upload a photo right here, but I can’t, so just use your imaginations. Close your eyes, focus on a solid double pane glass door…then all of a sudden; a small black creature with a solid white, snow crusted face appears. You take a step back, then two steps forward and laugh until you cry. That was my Annie, the day after we put our Gracie down. I know that Gracie had all fours in that prank. On with this apparent never-ending-story. Annie’s face was so packed with wet snow that I just plopped her in my big pup-friendly single big kitchen sink and hosed her down with warm water until all the snowballs were melted. I also noticed that she had snow packed in her nostrils and I was able to easily remove that with warm water with the aid of a couple of baby cue-tip swabs.

    Fast forward to this past weekend. Lots of rain, lots of mud on Saturday. For some unknown reason Annie decided to pretend the mud was snow and did another full-on, full throttle face plant head down in the mud. When I saw her at the glass door, I loved her more than life itself and I wanted to kill her at the same time. I let her stand outside while I started her bath, gathered up as many dog towels I could find, some shampoo and all the courage I could muster. At this point, one must understand that bathing a black dog covered in thick black mud is no easy task. Finally, it was over, and I could see her eyes again, however, I neglected to really look at her nostrils. Her wet black dog hair was partially covering her nose---that’s my story and I’m sticking to it, motherly guilt after the fact—and all.

    Now it’s Sunday, her Lysodren pill day. This was the second maintenance pill I had given her at home. Everything went ok but I also noticed that she had mud stuck in her nostrils, mostly in the left one. Fortunately, our vet is open from 10-3 on Sundays, so I called and asked the safest way to remove the mud plug. This was totally different from the snow plug. At this point the mud had hardened and I didn’t want to shove a cue-tip up there and potentially cause more problems. They told me what to do and how to do it---but I didn’t, because I had been hit with the memory of Gracie’s death just two months prior. I spent Sunday night crying for my lost Gracie while watching a hockey game and reading through all the grief help I could on this site. It was very therapeutic--but not for Annie.

    Now it’s Monday. I have a slight burst of energy and spent the day taking care of household business long neglected. Annie still has the mud plug in her nose and I am oblivious. She ate her supper, no problems.

    Now it’s today, .. I worked hard on Monday around the house, Daylight Savings Time is NOT my friend, and I’m a tad late getting around to feeding Annie.
    It was a little before 8am cst and Annie did not want to get out of bed. Her dad had let her out to potty about 5am. I fixed her breakfast and she did NOT want anything to do with food—not even the plate. She was lethargic, hubby told me that she had urinated a lot when he let her out and all I could think of was the totally irrational, “MY BABY IS GOING TO DIE NOW! I called the vet right away and asked if I should give her a Pred. tab and was told to bring her right in.

    If you are still with me at this point in this saga, Bless You! The best is yet to come. I promise you will laugh.

    At 8:53am this Tues. Hubby carried our limp baby girl into the vet’s office with me following in tears carrying her day bag. They knew we were coming and our favorite person in the office personally grabbed me for info to relay to the techs and the Doc. SPOILER ALERT!

    She took one look at Annie and said to me…and this is a direct quote, “It’s her nose”—Did you look at her nose—it’s plugged with mud?” “She’s probably not getting enough oxygen.”

    I didn’t know what to say, had no reply, no excuse, no nothing. All I could do was hand her the bag of stuff and off to my medical appointment over an hour away. My appt. wasn’t until 1:45 so we took care of some chores at home before we officially hit the road. At 12:03pm, (Hubby was a math major and can do quantum physics in his sleep but doesn’t have a clue how to operate the washing machine) Jerry suggested we call and check on Annie and see what her treatment plan for the day looked like. At this point, I can’t repeat the words to which I replied after I asked the question…”How is Annie doing?”(Too much silent profanity). The reply was from my favorite person at the vet clinic was, “I WON! It was her nose. The techs were very careful in removing the large plugs of dried mud from her nostrils and she is doing very well. Shortly after they finished, she ate her breakfast, her insulin shot was given and she has a wiggly tail whenever anyone walks by her special crate.”

    At this point in the conversation, I’m filled with a combination of horrible guilt, the ultimate in embarrassment, and the biggest sense of relief that a human being is capable of. I’m now crying tears of joy that my little baby Annie did not suffer a life threatening event and laughing so hard at the same time because of my own “blindness in grief”. Then, in his own way, my loving spouse, now driving me down a semi-truck filled highway turned to me and said, “Don’t get so worked up about this, Annie’s fine, maybe sometime she won’t be, but now she is. Smile.” Some of the most profound words ever spoken to me. I love this man and I love you all for sticking with me through this long-winded saga.

    On a technical note: while Annie was at the hospital today, I asked them to check her teeth, run some necessary bloodwork to see if she could have her teeth cleaned with anesthesia and the answer came back YES. She is due for a glucose curve on Thursday then we will make the appt. I also contacted her veterinary ophthalmologist and she is on the books for cataract surgery on May 17, 2019. Remember, I said, on the books….it will depend on her combined health at the time.

    Today was a HUGE revelation to me as a new mom of a Cush pup, a renewed sense of hope…. the longest laugh at myself I’ve had in years and a very, very subtle—but paw firm message from my angle Gracie to keep vigilant eyes-on her baby sis. Message heard loud and clear Gracie—thank you.

    Long story short---eyes, ears, heart on call 24/7/365. To everyone of all ages living with a Cush pup or any pup with issues or not. If you "see something, say something" to the person in charge of care. Wow, what a day, thanks for listening universe. Blessings to all, Karen

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Glen Cove, NY
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    1,565

    Default Re: New to Cushings

    A great story, Karen! Part of being a mom to a cushpup is the , how shall I say it, completely irrational paranoia. Because we are always watching for signs, any little things will become HUGE. I can't tell you how many times I run to the vet now and am told there is nothing wrong. But after losing Lena, I don't take any chances with any of them. Poor Lee never saw the vet as many times as she did after she was diagnosed and on Vetoryl.

    After we got Sibbie, which was so soon after Lee passed, if she burped I was at the vet. A few months ago our 15 year old teacup chihuahua, Doree would not eat. She threw up and had diarrhea. I told my boss I had to work from home because I was pretty sure she was going to die. Ran to the vet, they did blood work, xrays, full exam, meds for the diarrhea and vomiting. $660 dollars later it turned out to be just a stomachache. Everything came back perfect. But I figured the money was well spent because we knew she was in great shape for her age. The next time it happened I knew not to panic.

    But that is the new norm for us. Watching, worrying, panicking! On the upside it means plenty of funny, embarrassing stories! Enjoying the everyday things! And being happy with a good day!
    Joan, mom to my Angel Lena, Doree, Gable, Cooper, Angel Phoenix and now Sibble.

  8. #28
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    Apr 2009
    Location
    Georgia
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    13,969

    Default Re: New to Cushings

    All I can say is, WHEW!!!!

    What a relief, and as Joan says, what a great story!

    If you’re anywhere near as old as me and remember Joni Mitchell’s classic song, “Woodstock,” my favorite line (which I quote often) is, “Life is for learning.” And that it is, a thousand-fold. No matter what mistake I make, I try to tell myself that there was value to it, because now I learned something that I didn’t know before — and that’s one mistake I won’t ever make again!

    Please give Annie a big hug for us, and give yourself a “virtual” hug, too. Here’s hoping that today is a much calmer and happier day, all the way around!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Spring Valley, Il
    Posts
    169

    Default Re: New to Cushings

    Greetings All,

    I wanted to post earlier but my paranoia after our escapades of yesterday prevented me from doing so. However, enough of this day has passed that I feel comfortable in making this announcement: WE HAD A GOOD DAY! NOTHING HAPPENED! In fact, it was so good that I made a call to our vet clinic and told them. I could hear the laughter in the background but with my infamous reputation down there, I expected nothing less.

    I think we are still fighting with Daylight Savings Time and it took Annie a little while to get herself going this morning but she finally plodded her way into the kitchen after I let the can opener on her dog food make a few extra laps. Today was her Lyso med day and of course my anxiety was running high. I did my best to pretend that nothing was different and she licked her plate clean and didn't even detect the pill hidden a a little meatball of dog food. I walked over to the calendar and drew a little heart.

    Maybe it's my imagination, but it has seemed to me that on her Lyso med days, she seems to drink a little more water and requires a little more food. She also sleeps more. Is there anything to that?

    As I close out the day, I just wanted to let you know that nothing bad happened at our house today---and I just know that you all understand how good that feels. Blessings and be well. Karen

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    rural central ARK
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    Default Re: New to Cushings

    I don't remember Squirt having that reaction on her Lyso days but it could be my memory. I would think that is certainly possible however. When it's time for a dose the adrenals have already started to regenerate a bit which could cause a reccurence of the signs to a small degree. Then when the maintenance dose is in the system those adrenals calm down once again and those little signs disappear. So I wouldn't worry overly much about that...but GREAT JOB, mom, in picking up on that change! That is the sign of an observant pet parent which is the most crucial part of dealing with Cushing's.

    Your story brought laughter to me and a memory of ONE of my own panics with Squirt. We were laying in bed one evening and I started rubbing her belly. I felt lumps up and down her belly where her teats were. It scared me to pieces! By midnight I had diagnosed breast cancer and was hysterical. I cried uncontrollably and hugged on her all night long so neither of us got any rest. I was at the vet's office as soon as they opened and a complete basket case as I told her vet, with whom I have a great relationship, she had breast cancer. He carefully examined her while I sobbed on the other side of the exam table then looked at me and said, "Those are her boobs, you big booby!" She had lost her pot belly and for the first time in years I could feel her mammary glands! Perfectly normal but we hadn't had "normal" in quite some time so I was not prepared for it at all! So, yes, I could SO relate to your adventure the other day....that is perfectly NORMAL for us cush parents and don't let anyone tell you differently. LOL For a long time I referred to these episodes as twitching and those of us who experienced them twitchers. So welcome to the Twitcher Team!

    Hugs,
    Leslie
    "May you know that absence is full of tender presence and that nothing is ever lost or forgotten." John O'Donahue, "Eternal Echoes"

    Death is not a changing of worlds as most imagine, as much as the walls of this world infinitely expanding.

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