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Thread: My 13 Year Old Dog - New Diagnosis Questions about Vetoryl

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
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    Default My 13 Year Old Dog - New Diagnosis Questions about Vetoryl

    Hi

    I'm new to the forum and actually new to posting or asking questions on any forum so please bare with me.
    My 13 year old Maltipoo was just diagnosed with Cushings. She has had elevated Liver enzyme levels for a while but had not been displaying any additional symptoms until recently. Increased thirst and urination. Last week we had the low dose dexamethasone supression tests (LDDS) which confirmed the pituitary dependent Cushings. Our vet prescribed 30mg of Veroryl to start and I'll be honest this medication terrifies me. I only just picked it up and haven't given her the first dose because I have some additional questions.

    My girl only ways 20lbs, isn't this a higher dose than she should be on to start? I'm afraid of her crashing. I'm really just looking to see if overall everyone has a positive experience with Vetoryl. Researching online shows mixed results.

    Has anyone tried Anipryl to treat? It seems much safer.

    Thank You

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    California
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    Default Re: My 13 Year Old Dog - New Diagnosis Questions about Vetoryl

    Hello, and welcome,
    I only have a moment to post right now, so I will be brief. The starting dose for Vetoryl should not exceed 1 mg. per pound of the dog's weight. Since your dog weighs 20 pounds, yes 30mg. is too high. Hopefully someone will be around shortly to review your options in detail. This drug is very dangerous and needs to be monitored correctly, with the proper dosage to be effective. I personally would not start with 30 mg with a 20 pound dog.
    Kathy and Angel Buddy. The mightiest of all lizard hunters!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
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    Default Re: My 13 Year Old Dog - New Diagnosis Questions about Vetoryl

    Hi

    Thank you so much for your quick response. My instinct said the same thing. That's why I didn't start the medication this weekend. I'm going to call and ask for a follow up appointment with the vet now. Not confident in the information I've received so far from them.

    Jamie

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    California
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    Default Re: My 13 Year Old Dog - New Diagnosis Questions about Vetoryl

    I am speaking for myself only. Others may/do have differing opinions. Unless I'm giving a needed antibiotic, I rarely start new medications over a weekend, when my vet may be unavailable. To be fair, I have had dogs with severe allergies, so I am very careful about introducing anything new.

    This was/is my first forum also. I found it out of desperation over six years ago, and keep hanging around to assist others when I can. We have brillant Cushings experts on this forum. I am not one of them, but someone should be along shortly. You are doing great! Hang with us and ask all the questions you want.
    Kathy and Angel Buddy. The mightiest of all lizard hunters!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Georgia
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    14,067

    Default Re: My 13 Year Old Dog - New Diagnosis Questions about Vetoryl

    Here’s a belated welcome from me, too! Kathy is being way too modest re: her own Cushing’s knowledge, and I’m really glad that she had the chance to respond to you so promptly. I can only “second” what she’s already advised — research and experience has shown that dogs who are started out on doses of trilostane that don’t exceed a formula of 1 mg. per pound tend to experience fewer unwanted side effects at the outset of treatment then do dogs who are dosed at higher rates. Based upon monitoring tests and degree of symptom resolution, dosing may need to be increased subsequently. But it is easier on a dog’s system to start low and work upward, rather than vice versa. Your vet may be trying to save you money by prescribing a single daily 30 mg. capsule as opposed to two 10 mg. capsules. But money saved in medication costs can be lost in the need for additional monitoring or treatment in the event of overdose.

    In the event that you’d like to arm yourself with some printed information when you talk to your vet, scroll down to the second post in this thread, and you’ll find helpful references:

    https://www.k9cushings.com/forum/sho...-and-Resources

    As far as Anipryl, apparently it can control symptoms in a specific subset of dogs whose pituitary tumors are located in one particular portion of the pituitary gland. Over the years, we’ve had a few owners who have reported success with Anipryl, but unfortunately not very many. However, if your girl is not unduly compromised by her Cushing’s symptoms at this point in time, you might want to experiment with Anipryl for a few months. If it doesn’t help, you can shift back to a Vetoryl at that point. Given your dog’s age, my own opinion would be that her immediate quality of life is more of a treatment factor than is consideration of long term chronic systemic damage caused by Cushing’s. So if she’s not outwardly very uncomfortable, you might feel as though you have more time to experiment. Just a thought. However, trilostane definitely has a much higher efficacy rate, so if you want to get onboard now with symptom resolution, it’s the more reliable choice — but at the currently recommended dosage level.

    Marianne

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