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Thread: my best friend gizmo

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    Default my best friend gizmo

    My dog gizmo has been by my side since I was 9. I'm 21 now and three nights ago he started having seizures. We took him in and were told about his liver and thyroid count. But that didn't explain the seizurseizures. They told me I will have to pay 2000 for an mri of his brain because its a possibility he has a tumor on his brain. I don't have money for that as of right now and would bet my life that he has cushings and that's whata causing the seizures. He's constantly hungry always searching for food. Drinks an amazing amount of water. He has a big belly always panting due to beinf over heated. His back legs just recently got weak after his seiazures. I am so scared to think he has a tumor on hia brain, how do I find out if he has cushingCushing, he is my best friend and I can't imagine not having him. Please help

  2. #2
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    Apr 2009
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    Default Re: my best friend gizmo

    Hello to you and Gizmo. I am very sorry about Gizmo's problems, but really glad you've found us.

    I have been the owner of a Cushpup and currently have a non-Cushpup with seizure disorder of unknown origin, so I have some familiarity with both issues . My very first question for you is, what exactly were Gizmo's abnormal liver and thyroid counts? The reason I ask is because low thyroid function can be a cause of seizures in and of itself, and it is one of the most easily treatable health problems in dogs -- you simply give a daily thyroid supplement. If Gizmo's basic thyroid level is low ("T4" on blood chemistry panels), then the very first thing I'd ask for is a a more advanced and complete thyroid panel. This may require that the blood sample be sent to a specialized lab for analysis. The complete panel can give you a better picture of any thyroid dysfunction, including an indication as to whether a finding of low thyroid is a primary problem in and of itself, or whether it is secondary to another endocrinological disorder such as Cushing's.

    It is certainly possible that Gizmo may also have Cushing's and low thyroid can be a result of the disease, but if it is low thyroid that is causing the seizures, the very first priority would be to initiate thyroid supplementation in order to see whether or not the seizures resolve. It is true that pituitary tumors associated with Cushing's can sometime enlarge to the extent that pressure is placed elsewhere in the brain, causing neurological problems including seizures. But seizures are not the most common side effect of such enlarging tumors -- you more often see problems such as loss of appetite, mental confusion or "dullness," odd circling behavior, etc.

    An MRI of the head is indeed a very expensive undertaking, so I would certainly want to make sure that other possible causes are first ruled out entirely. So to back up, can you tell us more about the liver and thyroid abnormalities (give us the name and actual lab value for the things that are out-of-whack), and let's start from there.

    I will add that we have never found out the cause for the seizures in my 9-year-old Lab girl, but we also have not opted for the expense of an MRI. We have never found any lab abnormalities that point to a cause, and given the fact that she was 6 when the seizures started, it is possible that they are being caused by a brain tumor (epileptic seizures usually start at an earlier age). But she has been totally controlled on phenobarbital and seizure-free for three years now. So we feel very lucky and grateful that she is doing so well. I just wanted to offer that out as a ray of hope to you!

    Going back full circle, though, here's a link that explains more about the importance of thorough thyroid testing in the presence of seizures:

    http://www.canine-epilepsy-guardian-...anneCarson.htm

    We were really hoping that might be what is wrong with our girl, but alas, it was not that simple for us.

    Marianne

  3. #3
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    Oct 2013
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    Default Re: my best friend gizmo

    Hi marianne. Thank u so much for your support, his meds he's on right now are ammoxicillian, levetiracetam, lactulose syrup, and liver diet food so I'm looking at his lab result teat sheet. I don't know what is what but here is what it says. Alp is at 240 when it shhould be between 10-84. His ggt is at 28 when it ahould be between 0-10. His alt is at 1402 wheb it should be between 5-65.

  4. #4
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    Oct 2013
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    Default Re: my best friend gizmo

    Labblab , Marianne. I'm in the UAE right now and all of this just happened with my baby gizmo. My poor daughter is trying her best to help and to do anything to keep him going. I will be flying home at the end of next week to help get him medically stabilized if I can. I can give you all his lab results when I get in since my daughter doesn't understand. I will be in touch with you when I get into the states. I want nothing more than to help my precious baby boy. Thanks for the info. Maybe we can chat on the phone when I get home, this is all new to me. Thanks you.

    Phyllis crager

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Georgia
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    13,978

    Default Re: my best friend gizmo

    Hi Phyllis,

    This is very kind of your daughter to be trying to help with Gizmo. I know you are so anxious, though, to be with him yourself. I hope you travel safely. In the meantime, those elevated liver values make me wonder whether the vet has well and truly ruled out primary liver disease as a cause of the seizures. Here is an article I just found that talks about the possible linkage:

    http://www.canine-epilepsy.com/liverdisease.htm

    I would think that an abdominal ultrasound and bile acids test would be two important diagnostic tools to examine what is going on with Gizmo's liver. If it were me, I'd want more clarity re: the liver issues before considering a brain tumor.

    Also, as far as thyroid function, the blood value that would signal a need for further testing is labelled as "T4" on the blood chemistries report. If the T4 is abnormally low (or high), there is further blood testing that can be performed to help clarify the nature of a genuine problem.

    We will be looking forward to reading more here about Gizmo from either/both you and your daughter. I surely hope that the seizures have not worsened.

    Marianne

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