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Thread: Interpreting dog

  1. #1
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    Default Interpreting dog

    Luke seems to be doing ok at dog school but there is always a hesitation when given a command to to something.

    It usually goes like this..command....pause..... then sometimes he does it and sometimes not.

    Several thoughts that may be going through his head...

    I know what you want but what's wrong with what I am doing now?
    I'm not going to drop, the grass is wet and cold!
    If I do it, what's in it for me?

    Jenny

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Interpreting dog

    Sounds like Luke is pretty smart!

    I know what you want but what's wrong with what I am doing now?
    I'm not going to drop, the grass is wet and cold!
    If I do it, what's in it for me?
    Isn't this the way most of us think?
    John (Roxee & Rozee's Dad)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Interpreting dog

    Jenny, LOL!! My mom used to be able to read our dogs like they were human kids talking, & do exactly what they needed or wanted to do. I'd stand their dumbstruck, "How did you know that?", I'd ask. Her response was always, "Don't you know how to interpret dog?"

    Debbie
    Mom to 2 Cushing's angels

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Interpreting dog

    Once when I was at the dog park I was giving a treat to someone else's dog. He's a very well trained dog and always has to sit for a treat, so I asked him to "sit". He looked at me, then looked at his mum as if to say "Is it OK if I sit for her?" She just nodded to him and he sat with a big grin on his face that said "You can gimme the treat now!"

    Alison

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Interpreting dog

    I'm not quite sure what Luke's age is, but could it be he's at "that age"? Is it only when he has to do a drop on the wet grass? Because there are in fact dogs who really dislike wet grass. Or it could be another dog has peed on that spot... some dogs wont drop where another dog has peed...

    But if this happens with other commands as well, and thus isn't related to wet grass exclusively, it sounds more like Luke isn't too convinced you're the true packleader so he can obey at his own convenience and time

    I have no idea if this is the case or not but there's a nice example in my own circle of friends. This is a couple with no children and they have a mixed breed dog. When out on walks, this dog dictates the walk Wich direction he wants to go to, where he wants to stop and sniff and for how long and he will lunge at every other dog he encounters. They don't understand why the dog behaves this way because they are doing everything right, as tought at the dogschool. And that may be the case but....at home, this dog runs the show. He eats with them at the diningtable from his own plate, sleeps where ever he wants, etc. Then, when they go for a walk, they want to take control of the dog but logically, the dog "disagrees", thinking..."hey, I am the packleader at home so why on earth would you think I would even remotely listen to you now?"

    This is an extreme example but the moral of this example is that if you're not a true packleader at all times, you cannot expect the dog to obey at all times It also depends on the dogs character of course...some need more firm leadership with no exceptions at all, others will do fine with a bit of "spoiling" at home but will still obey outdoors.

    So it could be that you just need to be a bit more of a packleader in other situations as well, to get Luke to obay outdoors

    Again, I don't know the exact situation, so I do not know if this is the case here...just a possibility

    Saskia and Yunah

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Interpreting dog

    I've noticed some dogs are very reluctant to drop in the presence of other dogs if the other dogs make them nervous. I guess they are afraid of being jumped on or maybe giving some doggy signal that they don't want to give in the company in which they find themselves.

    Alison

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Interpreting dog

    Thanks Sas,
    I am sure part of it is my not being the packleader. Luke does have rules and he will obey me but hubby has more control. I also think that age could be a factor too because Luke is approaching the terrible twos. We have had him 6 months and have no idea on his life before. He does want to please me but has such a short attention span. I am waiting for a doggie DNA test to come in the mail so we can find out a bit about his heritage. It might not help to know but it is a bit of fun to find out. My guess is Poodle/Italian greyhound and maybe some others in the not too distant past.
    Jenny

    PS Alison you may have something there because we have to be on the end of the line before he will drop or I have no hope at all. It does seem like he doesn't want to show weakness with the others.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Interpreting dog

    If he's been in a multi-dog rescue situation he may well have been on the receiving end of some pretty out-of-control, boisterous behavior, possibly from much larger dogs. That could make him even more nervous about it than he ordinarily be.

    Alison

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Interpreting dog

    When we were in obedience school, we were asked to bring $50 treats - what to Luke would be like a $50 gift to you?

    Jack is totally food oriented so we use a semi-moist dog food that's not the healthiest as a food overall but is better than actual treats - Natural Balance rolls - like a sausage - that we cut up into small pieces. We can cut them any size we want, which is nice too.

    There are a number of things for Jack for which NO treat is better - squirrels and rabbits mainly. And some things he can be yanked back from but a treat wouldn't stop him from going in the first place, like the Jack Russell terriers next door.

    Sophia has mentioned with her own challenging dog that she uses commands that require him to be in a vulnerable position to determine how relaxed and comfortable he is in a situation. If he's not comfortable, he won't go into those vulnerable positions.

    Boy do I understand short attention span!! If it's not on a squirrel, that is. When it comes to squirrels, Jack is totally focused!

    Sophia Yin has many videos you can watch at her website - maybe they will give you some ideas. www.aksdryin.com.

    Natalie

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Interpreting dog

    I'll check out those videos and hopefully get some ideas.
    Luke has been more ditsy the last two weeks and the only difference is that we have been allowed to take them over the agility course (on lead of course) and he just loves it. We have to go first because he is so fast that he catches all the other dogs because they hesitate and he just goes for it. The trouble is that when we then get back to the basics Luke is fixated on the course and just won't concentrate. He just watches all the other dogs on the agility course and cries. The only trouble is that to be allowed to do the course properly he has to be controllable off lead and I am not sure that will ever happen.

    As for treats, this week I took small pieces of cooked chicken breast and he seemed to absolutely love it. I am still coming to terms with giving treats while training as when I took Nelson (oh so many years ago) it was all done with praise and the fact that Nelson was a star makes the contrast between dogs so much greater.

    Jenny

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