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  #1  
Old 07-02-2009, 08:31 PM
Harley PoMMom's Avatar
Harley PoMMom Harley PoMMom is offline
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Default Phosphatidylserine

This is a supplement that I was wondering if anyone has looked into. I've done some. From what I gather it is a naturally-occurring phospholipid found in all cells of the body, with particularly high concentrations in the brain and it helps to block cortisol. Here are a couple links I found interesting.

http://www.animalwellnessmagazine.com/m/m86/hvetad.htm

Talking with Dr. Martin Goldstein holistic veterinary advice, 4th question down and starts out: My 13½-year-old terrier mix has recently been diagnosed with Cushing’s disease.


http://www.biomedexperts.com/Abstrac...ress_in_humans

Altho this study is from the 1990's and done on humans, it did make me go hmmm.

Lori
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Old 07-02-2009, 08:48 PM
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Default Re: Phosphatidylserine

I remember reading about phosphatidylserine (PS, for short ) a long time ago, back when my boy was dxed with Cushing's and when I was hoping that there was a "natural" treatment that actually worked. (I have found out since then, that there really isn't a "natural" treatment that actually works well enough to treat and properly control the cortisol production in a confirmed case of canine Cushing's, but that's another very long story)

Here's what I did learn about "PS", however.

Phosphatidylserine has indeed been shown to lower cortisol levels somewhat, but I am pretty sure that any studies that were done that actually did show a cortisol-lowering effect were done on healthy human athletes whose cortisol production was only temporarily increased due to excessive exercise, for example ... not on Cushing's patients (human or canine) whose cortisol production was pathologically excessive and chronic.

PS may have some cortisol-lowering effect on a Cushing's dog's cortisol production, but IMO, it would be like taking an aspirin to treat a migraine headache ... i.e. it would have very little effect, and certainly not enough of an effect on the pathological, chronic and usually excessively high cortisol production of a Cushing's dog to be considered an effective treatment option.

edited to add: I actually contacted Dr. Goldstein's Clinic way back then, when my dog was first dxed with Cushing's, to ask him if he could kindly provide me and/or my Specialist Vet with any documentation and treatment protocols for using phosphatidylserine that he might have, so that we could look it over and possibly try it, but the only thing I was offered (over and over again) was the opportunity to have Dr. Goldstein evaluate and treat my dog (I am in Canada and Dr. Goldstein is in the USA) via long-distance (via "BNA" blood analysis and telephone consults), for a ridiculously expensive fee (and I mean ridiculously expensive!). They refused to send me or my Vet any information at all about PS and their supposed success using it to treat their canine cushing's patients.

Last edited by acushdogsmom; 07-02-2009 at 09:01 PM. Reason: to add something
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Old 07-02-2009, 09:19 PM
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Default Re: Phosphatidylserine

Thanks for the feedback, Cushy.

I guess that old adage is true - if it look to good to be true it usually is!

That was so horrible of Dr. Goldstein not to send any information to you or your vet, it should always be for the life of the animal that they uphold, and I am so sorry to have brought back this bad memory for you.

Hugs.
Lori
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Old 07-02-2009, 09:27 PM
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Default Re: Phosphatidylserine

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harley PoMMom View Post
Thanks for the feedback, Cushy.

I guess that old adage is true - if it look to good to be true it usually is!

That was so horrible of Dr. Goldstein not to send any information to you or your vet, it should always be for the life of the animal that they uphold, and I am so sorry to have brought back this bad memory for you.

Hugs.
Lori
It's okay, Lori, it's not such a bad memory ... after I got nowhere with Dr. G. I went the traditional route and treated with Lysodren (under the supervision of our IM Specialist Vet), and I got my boy back, wonderfully healthy and happy and playful again. He lived another 6 and a half happy and healthy years (on Lysodren). We also used some "supplements" in addition to the Lysodren treatment, such as Milk Thistle and sam-e and fish oils and vitamins, etc

I was very disappointed in Dr. Goldstein though.
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Old 07-03-2009, 08:13 PM
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Default Re: Phosphatidylserine

isn't this similar to the substance in Flax seeds which helps to suppress cortisol?

Jeff
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Old 07-03-2009, 09:34 PM
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Default Re: Phosphatidylserine

Jeff,

I think PS is supposed to be more similar to melatonin..If I followed Glynda's wonderful explanation correctly..but I could be wrong..
Quote:
Originally Posted by lulusmom View Post
Geeze, Les, you might as well ask why the earth is round. You cannot believe how many times I've read the UTK info on this and how many times I've accessed the dictionary to try to understand all the big words. One big word begat another big word and so on and so on until my eyes roll back into my head and I start cussing. There is no way that I could ever explain the actual process by which those six adrenal hormones magically appear but I'll try to give you a quick and dirty that I hope you can understand. So here goes nothing.

Aromatase is an enzyme that is involved in the production of estrogen. It acts by catalyses (big word – look it up) the conversion of testosterone to estradiol, which is an estrogen by the way. Aromatase enzyme is located in the estrogen producing cells in the adrenal glands, ovaries, placenta, testicles, fat tissue and the brain. Note to self: Lysodren only targets the adrenals so it has no effect if the estradiol is being produced in the latter five areas of the body. Melatonin, a naturally occurring hormone in the body that we cushdog parents buy in a bottle, is an aromatase inhibitor. UTK always recommends Melatonin and phytoestrogen treatment when estradiol is elevated. [Phytoestrogens, sometimes called "dietary estrogens", are a diverse group of naturally occurring non steroidal plant compounds that, because of their structural similarity with estradiol (17-β-estradiol), have the ability to cause estrogenic or/and antiestrogenic effects] Lignans, found in the flaxseed, has the highest concentration of phytoestrogen found in plants. Lignans is also an aromatase inhibitor and with its phytoestrogenic activity, competes with estradiol for tissue estrogen receptors. So the quick answer to your question is if estradiol is elevated, UTK recommends both Melatonin and Lignans

21 hydroxylase is an enzyme which is involved in the biosythesis of aldosterone and cortisol. Melatonin inhibits the 21 hydroxylase enzyme.

3-beta-HSD is an enzyme which catalyses the synthesis of progesterone from pregnenolone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone from 17-hydroxypregnenolone, and androstenedione from dehydropiandrosterone in the adrenal gland. Note: the synthesis of all six adrenal steroids requires 3beta HSD. Melatonin and lignans inhibit 3-beta-HSD

So there ya go.

Glynda
Lori
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